Jon Fazzaro

Me

Hey.
I'm a music and software nerd who's probably off looking for a cup of coffee right now.

Functional Programming and the Single Responsibility Principle are totally sittin' in a tree. »

Usually the first thing about functional programming that gets an OOP lifer’s dander up is that the variables are immutable by default. Just to underscore that: you cannot (and should not) change the value of a variable in functional programming.

How, then, does the functional programmer ever get anything done? With functions. Nootch.

let x = 9
let z = add x x
assert (18 = z)

Except now we’re not talking about functions like the homunculus Dr. Evil was taunting a few paragraphs back. Functional code would never get off the ground if that was a function. What makes FP tick at scale is that its functions are small and discrete, designed to be composed together to achieve a larger goal.

Put another way? Stop me if you’ve heard this one before. They are responsible for doing exactly one thing. That’s right–functional programming and the Single Responsibility Principle are totally sittin’ in a tree.

Think Like A Functional Programmer For Better Object Oriented Code [ Aptera ]

The elusive cat-shaped burndown chart. 
Gotta catch ‘em all.

The elusive cat-shaped burndown chart. 

Gotta catch ‘em all.

Everything Dies.

checkfu:

It is with a heavy heart that we at Check Fu! announce that our little app has run its course. Within the next thirty days, the sun will set on checkfu.com, and you will no longer be able to log in and access your account or its data.

Thank you for being a part of Check Fu!, and may you always be mindful of your fortune.

Sa!
—The Check Fu! Grasshoppers

It became clear that each member of the pair was working on two problems simultaneously. »

the three problems of pair programming

The driver was solving the software problem at hand mentally, while also working with the device mechanically to provide input or to reveal information. The navigator was also solving the software problem at hand mentally, while working to communicate verbally with the driver and not touching the computer.

That last part was a challenge for some of the navigators.

The creative tension in a programming pair is the pull of working on the common problem with your partner combined with the push of struggling with a problem that your partner does not have. The most successful pairs showed both solid communication and patience with their partner’s “other” problem.

I just helped some third graders learn how to code - here’s what they taught me. [ Aptera ]